≡ Menu

Why you should skimp on more things

Do you like perfection? Get rid of it.

Before you call me names, read on.

Get me right. I say skimp on more things, not on everything and no botch.

Anyway what I mean is:
Instead of striving for perfection, do it just good enough and come to the point where you can say: I did it!

If the need for improvement arises the thing surely returns on your radar.

Ok, you’re right. Michelangelo strove for perfection and his art set standards very few can measure up to until today.

Did Michelangelo pay a price?

From what I know about him, I’d say yes. He led a life of bitterness for he was never really satisfied with his accomplishments. Imagine the difference for his live and perhaps for his art had he found a way to go about his art with passion instead of obsession.

So Skimp On More Things really means to go about it with all you have, yet in a relaxed way. Remember, relaxed means your subconscious powers spring to your aid. On the other hand if you tighten up you loose most of that aid and you reduce your powers to your conscious abilities.

Going for perfection is like driving with a  partly blocked brake. For some people it’s even a fully blocked brake.

What does perfect mean?

To beat the point home let’s look at the origins of the word perfect: According to the Online Etymology Dictionary it has two meanings:

1. from L. perfectus “completed,” pp. of perficere “accomplish, finish, complete,”

2. from per- “completely” + facere “to perform”

Nowadays, the word has a different meaning (AskOxford):

1 having all the required elements, qualities, or characteristics.

2 free from any flaw; faultless.

3 complete; absolute: it made perfect sense.

You see, the meaning of the word has changed from “Get it done” to “Do it absolutely flawless.”

What’s in it for you?

Mixing the two meanings gives a good affirmation for doing anything:

“Do it as good as you can at this moment (= faultless) and get it done.”

Karl

P.S. This article is a perfect example for: “Do it as good as you can at this moment and get it done.”

Lese die deutsche Version

Comments on this entry are closed.

Next post:

Previous post: